How to Make Homemade Bone Broth

Since we're talking about bone health this week, I would be remiss not to include something on bone broth. As you might imagine, it has the everything needed for healthy bone; it is the optimal bone health supplement.  

But bone broth is also good for health in general.  When a loved one is sick, what is among the first foods we think of to give them? Chicken noodle soup!  And while chicken noodle soup may not regularly be made with actual bone broth these days, it is synonymous with promoting health. The health benefits of bone broth stem from its being loaded with amino acids, nutrients and minerals including proline, glycine, collagen, chondroitin and gelatin. These make it excellent for joint health, gut health and skin health.

While we may not always have time to make our own bone broth from scratch (me included), there may be a time you decide to "go for it."  This recipe is for that time. But there are organic, store bought version that are excellent as well. Flavor Chef is one option.  Bonafide Bone Broth is another brand and is one I've spent more money on than I care to admit.  

For those trying the recipe, here it is! Bon Appétit!

Ingredients

2 lbs. Bone from organic, grass-fed cows

2 tablespoon Apple cider vinegar

1 gallon filtered water

4 cups organic vegetables (I like onions, celery & mushrooms)

2 cloves organic garlic

Directions

Place the bones into a stockpot. Pour the water in so that it covers the bones.  Make sure you add apple cider vinegar to water at the beginning of the cooking to maximize the amount of nutrients obtained from the bones.  Add the spices and veggies.  Pour the more water into the stockpot but leave room for the water to boil.  Bring the stockpot to a boil and then lower and let simmer for six hours.  I start out with a gallon and add more if it gets too low since liquid is leaving due to vapor.

Cook slowly at low heat for 48 hours to extract the nutrients from the bone.  While this recipe uses beef bones, chicken bones can cook for 24 hours.  After 48 hours, remove the stockpot from the heat and allow to cool slightly. You can toss all of the remaining solids and then strain the liquid through a colander into a bowl or Mason jar.  Once it’s cooled, you should refrigerate or freeze.


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